Our work in Libya continues

Talk for a Change and Peaceful Change Initiative (PCI) collaborate in Libya

Talk for a Change is currently collaborating with Peaceful Change Initiative (PCI) on a project aimed at improving human security and local development in Libya.

Our work is an on-going partnership, rooted in our shared commitment to peace building and strengthening social cohesion. Having previously worked at the local level in Sirte and Bane Wallid, for my second visit I worked with the Ministry of Local Governance in Tripoli, providing strategic planning expertise for ‘conflict sensitive development’ in Libya.

We delivered workshops for representatives from different ministerial departments, aiming to support them to develop strategies that would improve relationships between communities and local authority representatives, whilst also getting them to think about how they could strengthen relationships between different community groups

Again I was overwhelmed by the enthusiasm of civil society and government leaders that I worked with to pursue a vision based on trust, commonality and visible social justice.

I am also looking forward to attending the Libya Working Group discussion hosted by the Chatham House Middle East and North Africa Programme in partnership with the Peaceful Change initiative later this month.
Watch this space……………

Raj Bhari
Company Director

An update on our work in Libya

Talk for a Change is currently collaborating with Peaceful Change Initiative (PCI) on a project aimed at improving human security and local development in Libya. We have been invited to share community cohesion and community dialogue best practice from our work in the UK.

So on a bitterly cold spring morning, I boarded a plane destined for Tripoli. Having previously worked in South Asia and South America I was completely at ease with new landscapes and cultural contexts. In fact I was looking forward to discovering Libyan culture and hospitality. I was however also aware of the fact I was in a country that had recently been in a violent conflict. Continue reading “An update on our work in Libya”

Making the everyday ordinary extraordinary – integration rethink continues.

The message from IPPR’s policy paper, Rethinking Integration is Let’s think more about the everyday when we’re talking about integration.  That’s welcome when the debates about integration (cohesion as was) have been polarised between complex and competing perspectives on multiculturalism and liberal citizenship. At the same time isn’t it extraordinary that we rarely hear this message? It is in the everyday that we get on with getting on with each other – it is the everday ordinary extraordinary.  Continue reading “Making the everyday ordinary extraordinary – integration rethink continues.”

If you work with 18-25 year olds in areas affected by last summer’s riots we’d like your opinion

Talk for a Change is working with Kaizen Partnership  on research commissioned by the Resilience Consortium, a group of 29 youth organisations concerned to find a constructive and practical way forward after the riots of 2011.

Our research question is  ‘How do we foster young people’s capacity and contribution to communities in order to reduce the likelihood and/or severity of public disorder in the future?’  We are interested in discovering the key untapped assets, talents and resources that young people and communities have that can support community resilience.  Continue reading “If you work with 18-25 year olds in areas affected by last summer’s riots we’d like your opinion”

Talk for a Change in debate with our colleagues

Jo Broadwood and Nicola Sugden, two of  Talk for a Change’s directors, attended the Conflict Research Society conference in Coventry last week. We presented our recent publication We need to talk about ..can discussing controversial issues strengthen community relations? and entered useful debate with other practitioners. The main topics of debate were how best to use the contact hypothesis, the importance of focussing on differences as well as similarities when in dialogue with conflicting groups, and the pros and cons of local and national organisational set ups for working on good relations in the UK at present.  Continue reading “Talk for a Change in debate with our colleagues”